Legend of Zelda

Crafty Octorock!

octoroc

And this little cute octorok! And not just any octorok--it's a boss. I love all of the little details on the top of him (Geek Central Station).

When I see things like this, I get a little worried that if I ever get the Victorian house I want it will turn into a fannish version of my great aunt's house.

  • Crocheted Super Mario coin doilies
  • Knitted Octorock tea cozies
  • Sephiroth tapestries on the walls
  • Fine art dragon paintings

I could go on, but I don't want to scare Brian with more of these musings.  It would be awesome though.

Tattoo: Respecting Your Video Game Roots

videogametattoo What beautiful shading and color work on this tattoo of Mario, Pac-man, Link, Megaman and Kirby.

It looks like the Tattoo isn’t finished.  If you look closely at Link’s hand, it  looks like he should be holding a sword.  Maybe it is just my personal bias.

(via About)

The Legend of Neil

the_beginning_mo I am so glad that Codex shared the link to Sandeep Parikh's new project.  Sandeep, probably best known as Zaboo from The Guild, is writing, directing, and producing a new series: The Legend of Neil.

The Legend of Neil is a webseries produced by Effinfunny.com, Atom.com, and Comedy Central. Written by Sandeep Parikh & Tony Janning, this series follows the reluctant adventures of Neil- a gas station attendant from Jersey who gets sucked into 'The Legend of Zelda' and has to fight his way out.

first_blood_mo That is the clean version, and I think I am going to save the full version for the credits.  All I can say is, if you loved the Legend of Zelda and you are not easily offended, then you will laugh your butt off.

Felicia Day (Codex) will be in Episode 3!

I have a few very nit-picky complaints about their site.  When I visited, neither the RSS for there site or for the show updates were working.  I signed up for the email newsletter, but hope to switch over the the RSS as soon as possible.  If you notice that they are working, please let me know.

The Legend of Neil

Life as a Story

I went out to write at the San Francisco Bread Company today. The longer I write, the more I realize how important it is to get out of the house, even if it is only to sequester myself at a small table in a cafe with my headphones on listening to music, surfing the web, struggling with new concepts and editing a book I wrote that I actual enjoy reading. It is odd how something as simple as a change of venue from my office to a cafe can change my mood and energy level, but I have read enough from other writers to know that I am not alone.

I have a theory about why something as simple as a change of venue can so profoundly effect a writer's mood.

I started writing as a defense mechanism. As a child, I grew up on a farm miles from the closet kid my age. I spent most of my time either on the phone, outside with my dog Red, or in my room inventing new stories with my Voltron and He-man action figures. When this wasn't enough, I started drawing crude comics and playing out a sort of paper theater with playing cards and my imagination. Through all this, my imagination was fueled by He-man, She-ra, Transformers, the books of Edgar Allen Poe and Mark Twain, and the fantasy world of Dungeons & Dragons. I didn't have anyone to play with, so I spent my time making up stories about these fantastical creatures, demigods, and demons. The music of Kiss and Dolly Pardon filled my nights in my room watching "Too Close for Comfort" dreaming of the day I would write my own "Cosmic Cow" strip.

When we moved to Maryland, things got worse. I had a strong accent, which got me beaten up in school a lot, and I had not people skills so the few friends I did make really had to work hard to get past my clumsy social interactions. I didn't know how to relate with these "people." They were so different from me, and they expected me to know how to act with them. I just didn't.

My salvation came through The Legend of Zelda, Final Fantasy, and my knowledge of Dungeons & Dragons. I played these games with them as a means of interacting. They gave a structure to our together time and gave me a common language to speak. In time, we added Marvel Superheroes, Robotech, Earthdawn, and the many classic White Wolf storyteller games- Vampire: The Masquerade, Were-wolf, Mage: The Ascension, Changeling: The Dreaming. In fact, I became friends with Brian through a Vampire Chronicle.

Through this role as the storyteller, Star Trek Fandom, and my near obsessive interest in music, I found my medium to talk to others.

Storytelling is who I am. It is how I comprehend the world and explains why I am so deeply involved with the works of Joseph Campbell. This is who I am for better or worse. From the many biographies about other writers I have read, I think we have all taken up the life of a storyteller as some sort of defense mechanism or way to make sense of the world. It is easier to lock yourself away from the world than to jump in and struggle within it.

When I force myself out of my cave, even if only to isolate myself from the settings I find myself in through headphones and work, it reminds me that the outside world is still there. It lets me see how people actually interact with each other, for better or worse, and on those rarest of occasions, allows me to have incredible conversations with people face to face.

It is hard to explain how isolating is can be at times to be a storyteller. The hours, days and weeks spent locked away from the world crafting a reality that I hope others will experience and enjoy with the same fervor that I do. The simple act of seeing other people and hearing other voices enlivens me.

Like other writers, I am an observer of life much more than I am a participant in it. These little glimpses of the world outside my friends and family and the characters I write about (feels more like with sometimes), grounds me and helps connect me with the bigger world that is so easy to let slip away.

I wish more people shared this experience. Looking out at this world of strangers that I may or may not ever see again, and watching the plots they have entwined themselves in. We all tell our own stories. That is the art of conversation, to weave an entertaining tale about ourselves and others. As these plot lines co-mingle and intertwine, the story of our family, friends, city, state and nation are told. These stories often matter more than the facts. (whether or not that should be true or not is a whole other discussion).

I recommend that you give this a try. Next time you are out with friends, watch the stories that you are telling each other closely and follow them out as if they are plot lines in a novel, movie, or television show. It is startling how often you can predict other peoples actions by listening to their backstory, current plot, and projecting that out as it would play out in the genre appropriate to the person. I am not saying that this is always the case, but more often than not you will be able to see what will happen before it does. This is also the best way to choose your course of action. How will your action effect the other all story. Try it out, I think you might be pleasantly surprised.

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